Who is Heavy Equipment Armor?

Heavy Equipment Armor was founded by the owner of Advanced Forest Equipment, Engineer of the original disc mulcher for skid steers. Being a mulching contractor for over 36 years, and safety always being a priority, he designed and built custom guarding to protect his operators and equipment. Eventually, this guarding became available to purchase through Advanced Forest Equipment. Due to the inquiries received about heavy equipment guarding, it became apparent there was a need in the industry that was not being filled; Heavy Equipment Armor was established. Guarding that was available through Advanced Forest Equipment is now under the HEA name. With new guarding products continually being engineered and coming to the market.

What types of guarding are currently offered?

HEA manufactures steel guarding and UL752 Level 1 ballistic guarding for CAT skid steers and excavators. Bolt on steel front door guards and cab guards are available for skid steers. We also make bolt on UL752 Level 1 ballistic replacement doors for skid steers.

For excavators, we deliver a bolt-on line of guarding products that include steel front window screens, top guards, and rock guards, and a bolt on UL752 Level 1 ballistic front window. Custom cab guard packages include running boards, light kits, box guards and more are available. Custom guarding is fabricated to the machine at our Northern Idaho facility.

What makes HEA different from other guarding manufactures?

HEA products are designed to fit each model of machine specifically. Our products are not a universal fit or cookie cutter fit. This allows for the best potential fit and use of the machines. HEA polycarbonate products are made of UL752 Level 1 polycarbonate that can hold up a ballistic attack. They are not milled or drilled. Most polycarbonate, offered by other companies are not ballistic rated, they are only impact
rated and have been milled and drilled to fit hinges and handles. Milling & drilling polycarbonate leaves it susceptible to micro-fractures.

Why is it important to have Heavy Equipment Armor products when operating heavy equipment?

Heavy Equipment Armor’s enhanced products add another safety protection level for the operator and the machine. A company’s most valuable asset is protected – It’s people. This, in turn, reduces injuries which reduce business costs and disturbance. Heavy Equipment Armor’s safety feature also improves work quality. Insurance claims fall in safe workplace environments with Heavy Equipment Armor’s enhanced guarding.

What is the difference between polycarbonate and ballistic polycarbonate?

There are a lot of different types of polycarbonate. The main difference between standard polycarbonate and a ballistic polycarbonate is the rating process that ballistic polycarbonate undergoes. Ballistic rated polycarbonate must be able to withstand a ballistic attack as tested at the Underwriters Laboratories. If the testing is successful, the product can be labeled as a UL752 Level 1 polycarbonate.

Why is UL rating so important?

Having an Underwriters Laboratory rating is very important because it means that the product has passed a series of tests designed to make a product fail. For instance, a UL752 Level 1 polycarbonate must withstand a ballistic attack from a 9mm full metal jacket projectile with a lead core.

Does this product work with the emergency escape features on my machine?

All Heavy Equipment Armor brands guarding is designed to work with the OEM safety escape features when installed correctly.

Can I have custom work done to my machine?

Heavy Equipment Armor does do custom work on excavators, skid steers, and other heavy equipment machines. Any heavy equipment machines needing custom work done MUST be brought to our location. As each item is custom fitted to your machine. Not all machines are the same.

Is it necessary to add guarding to a machine that is used to dig?

Every machine on an active job site should have some type of additional guarding to protect the operator and the equipment, but the addition of a steel screen may literally be the difference between life and death of an operator.